Public Involvement2019-08-21T10:27:58-05:00

Public Involvement

Public Outreach

Around the time of the project selection in early 2019, we began meeting with regulatory agencies, elected officials, and community leaders to introduce ourselves and the project. This opened communication paths to be able to promptly address questions and incorporate feedback as the project progresses.

In June 2019, we held informational open houses in each of the five counties in which the project is proposed, inviting the public to learn more about the project. We provided notice of the open houses in a variety of ways, including direct mailings to landowners abutting the project right-of-way and to municipal, county, federal and state officials and leaders; posted flyers at 21 libraries and 19 post offices along the project corridor; published print advertisements in 13 publications serving the project area; distributed a press release; posted a notice on our website; and other avenues to get the word out.

For anyone we may have missed at the open houses or those wanting to take another look at the information presented, please click here.

If you’re interested in continuing to learn more, we have a number of avenues to reach us and stay up to date as the project moves ahead, including:

  • Contacting us with questions, to provide comments, or to request a meeting as described here.
  • Joining our mailing list by asking via one of the contact methods above – we’ll provide news when major project milestones are reached
  • Checking this website as for the latest major project news
  • Following along with or joining the Article VII permitting process before the New York State Public Service Commission. We have more information about this in the next section.

Here’s a handout that summarizes the various ways to stay involved in the project. Getting Involved

Article VII Permitting

Article VII, ‘Siting of Major Utility Transmission Facilities,’ is the section of the New York State Public Service Law that requires a full review of the need for and environmental impact of the siting, design, construction, and operation of major transmission facilities in New York State.

Article VII establishes the forum in which community residents can participate with members of state and local agencies in the review process. The following is a chart showing the open and transparent process that allows for full public review and engagement. This means ongoing outreach, participation, and dialog at every step of the process.

We submitted the project’s application for a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need through Article VII on August 20, 2019. The Commission assigned case number 19-T-0549 to the project.  Here’s a link to the filed documents list: NYDPS-DMM: Matter Master 19-01931/19-T-0549

The application submission will begin a completeness review, followed by a technical review of the application by the Staff of the New York Public Service Commission, the Department of Public Service. We anticipate the permitting process, including submission of detailed Environmental Management and Compliance Plans will last approximately a year to 18 months.

One of the common permitting questions we’re asked is related to electric and magnetic fields. Through the Article VII permitting process, we’ll calculate the field strength at the edge of the existing utility right of way before and after the project. These values will be compared against New York State guidelines for electric and magnetic field strength. In fact, New York is one of just a few states with any such guidance for new transmission lines. To learn more, check out our Electric and Magnetic Fields Handout.

The New York Department of Public Service has additional information about how to follow along with or participate in the Article VII permitting process here. To formerly participate, a party would need to become an intervenor in the process. Additional information on how to do that, including accessing intervenor funding, is available in our Intervenor Handout and at the New York Department of Public Service.

Process Flow Chart